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Elementary courses by My Learning Oasis

Grade 8 - Complete Program

Back to School Objects
Ready for School
School Supplies
Elbow Greeting
School Supplies
Back to School with Mask
Teacher and Students in Science Class
School LIbrary

Course duration: 10 Months

The Grade 8 program is planned based on the learning outcomes of grade 7. At My Learning Oasis, teachers plan an integrated learning program based on the following subjects.

Anchor 1

The Arts

Strand: Dance

Learning outcome: Students in Grade 8 will develop or extend understanding of the following concepts through participation in various dance experiences (e.g., using elements and choreographic forms to communicate ideas and issues). 

ELEMENTS OF DANCE 

• body: body awareness, use of body parts (e.g., hips, shoulders), body shapes (e.g., angular, stretched, twisted), locomotor movements (e.g., leap, dart), non-locomotor movements (e.g., twist, rock), body bases, symmetry versus asymmetry, geometric versus organic shape, curved versus angular shape, isolation of body parts, weight transfer. 

• space: levels, pathways, directions, positive versus negative space, proximity of dancers to one another, various group formations, use of performance space.

• time: stillness, rhythm, tempo, pause, freeze, with music, without music, duration, acceleration/ deceleration. • energy: quality, inaction versus action, percussion, fluidity (e.g., glide, sink, fall, shiver). 

• relationship: dancers to objects, opposition, groupings (e.g., large and small groups), meet/part, follow/lead, emotional connections between dancers.

Strand: Drama
Learning outcome: Students in Grade 8 will develop or extend understanding of the following concepts through participation in various drama experiences. 

ELEMENTS OF DRAMA 

• role/character: analyzing the background, motivation, speech, and actions of characters to build roles; using voice, stance, gesture, and facial expression to portray character.

• relationship: analyzing relationships to develop the interplay between characters. 

• time and place: using props, costumes, and furniture to establish setting; modifying production elements to suit different audiences.

• tension: using various stage effects to produce specific audience reactions. 

• focus and emphasis: using a wide range of devices to highlight the central theme for the audience; making deliberate artistic choices to sharpen focus.

Strand: Music
Learning outcome: In Grade 8, students will build on their knowledge of the elements of music and related musical concepts that were introduced in Grades 1 to 7. Students will develop understanding of musical concepts through participation in musical experiences that involve listening, moving, creating, and performing (vocal and/or instrumental music). 

ELEMENTS OF MUSIC 

• duration: tempo markings and rhythms encountered in the repertoire.

• pitch: major and minor tonality; keys encountered in the repertoire. 

• dynamics and other expressive controls: all intensity levels; changes in levels. 

• timbre: tone colours of world music ensembles and instruments (e.g., gamelan, shakuhachi, doumbek, sitar, djembe, ocarina). 

• texture/harmony: monophonic, homophonic, and polyphonic music. 

• form: forms encountered in performance repertoire (e.g., minuet).


Strand: Visual Art
Learning outcome: In addition to the concepts introduced in Grades 1 to 7, students in Grade 8 will develop understanding of the following concepts through participation in a variety of hands-on, open-ended visual arts experiences.

 

ELEMENTS OF DESIGN 

Students will develop understanding of all elements of design. 

• line: directional lines; one- and two-point perspective to create depth; contour drawings of figures • shape and form: various visual “weights'' of forms (e.g., large, light-coloured forms can seem to have less weight than smaller, dark forms); complex three-dimensional constructions and motifs; gradation in size 

• space: one- and two-point perspective or foreshortening to create illusory space; informal converging lines in an image creating the illusion of space; adult human figures that are seven to eight heads in height; alternative systems for representing space (e.g., layered images in medieval art; disproportionately small images of people within a vast landscape in Chinese art to show the smallness of humans in relation to nature; images seen from several points of view simultaneously in Egyptian and cubist paintings) 

• colour: tertiary colours; contrast of colour; absence of colour Note: In creating multimedia art works, students may need some understanding of different colour models, such as RGB and CMY(K), and web safe colours. 

• texture: real and illusory textures that appear in the environment 

• value: cross-hatching to suggest volume and shadows; variation and increased range of gradation in value.

Anchor 2

Language

Strand: Oral Communication Media Literacy

Learning outcome: In this course, Grade 8 students independently choose to read, listen to, or interact with texts that have personal relevance in their day-to-day lives, including texts that deal with issues related to fairness, equity, and social justice. Students get access to a broad range of relevant texts: oral texts such as speeches, debates, presentations, radio advertisements or dramas, song lyrics, raps, and sound bites; print texts such as memoirs, autobiographies, historical fiction, science fiction, realistic fiction, satire, essays, reviews, editorials, letters to the editor, and books in their own first language; and media texts such as magazines, online zines, websites, blogs, public-service announcements, comedy shows, video games, and newspapers. Students apply their knowledge of different text forms – such as debates, speeches, persuasive letters, memoirs, realistic fiction, magazine articles, letters to the editor, maps, scripts, surveys, or graphs– in a wide range of learning contexts. While modelled, shared, and guided learning experiences continue to provide instructional support for intermediate students as they consolidate their essential skills and processes, the focus of instruction is on helping them develop the ability to independently choose and use appropriate forms, structures, vocabulary, conventions, and stylistic elements to communicate ideas and information effectively for diverse purposes and audiences

Anchor 3

Math
 

Strand: Number Sense and Algebra

Learning outcome: In this unit, students will review the major concepts that are necessary for success in the rest of the course. Fundamental training includes developing a strong number sense, reviewing order of operations, and understanding the concepts surrounding decimals, fractions, ratios and proportions.

Strand: Analyzing Relationships with Data
Learning outcome: Data - numbers and figures that are used to describe and make sense of the world around us - are only useful if they can be organized, analyzed and presented in ways that make sense to ourselves and each other. This unit is about using mathematical and graphical tools to understand data. Understanding of statistics and proportionality will be developed. Learning to recognize and manipulate linear relationships, and to extrapolate and interpolate data based upon preexisting data, are also investigated. Simple algebra to describe graphs will be introduced.

Strand: Linear Equations and Word Problems
Learning outcome: Building upon the algebra developed in Unit 2, students will learn to solve simple linear equations. Adding and subtracting polynomials, and the distributive law will be introduced and practiced. Multi-step equations will be examined. By the end of the unit, students will have experience translating written words into mathematical equations, and vice-versa.


Strand: Slopes and the Equation of a Line
Learning outcome: Based upon the understanding of linear equations developed in Unit 3, the concepts of slope, rates of change are introduced and we investigate how these ideas relate to practical relations such as distance-time relationships. The techniques and uses of finding the point of intersection of two lines on a graph will be studied.


Strand: Measurement and Geometry
Learning outcome: Students continue to develop spatial sense as they study right-angle triangles. They will learn that if two side lengths are known, then the length of the third can be figured out without measuring it, using the Pythagorean Theory. Students learn how to calculate unknown angles by applying the angle properties of intersecting and parallel lines. Students also build their understanding of very large units such as a terabyte and very small units like a nanosecond that are used in current technologies.


Strand: Measurement and Geometry

Learning outcome: The physical and mathematical properties of a variety of two- and three-dimensional shapes will be considered. Building on ideas of proportionality developed earlier, the relationships between distance, area and volume will be examined. Techniques for optimization design will be discussed. Essential knowledge in many trades, Pythagorean Theorem and Parallel Line Theorem will be studied in detail.

Anchor 4

Science
 

Strand: Cells

Learning outcome: The first unit in the Grade 8 Science course has students explore what is perhaps the most important physical tool a scientist uses – the microscope. The characteristics of living things and the cell theory form the basis for an understanding of the building block of life, the cell, and its components. Students will discover the process of cell division and cellular transport which will assist them as they move forward in this course and in their career as biologists. Finally, recent innovations in microbiology and the impact biological processes have on the environment are examined.

Strand: Fluids
Learning outcome: The concept of fluids' major influence on our lives is introduced and examined in greater detail with particle theory. The characteristics of fluids are investigated as they relate to viscosity, density and buoyancy. Humans ability to control the flow of fluids (fluid systems) is reviewed and students will communicate and apply an understanding of the concept when they design and build a pneumatic or hydraulic device. The impact fluids have on our environment, both good and bad, are introduced before being revisited later in the course.

Strand: Systems In Action
Learning outcome: An understanding that along with fluids, structures are everywhere in our lives is developed by examining both natural and man-made structures and their components. The terms mass, weight, work and energy are explored in more detail in Grade 8 and form the basis for an understanding of simple machines and their benefits. Mechanical advantage and system efficiency are terms that expose students to the realization that since the beginning of time, especially since the industrial revolution, man has been creating structures to make their lives easier. At the end of the unit, students turn the microscope on themselves and investigate the ways in which they can change their own impact on the environment.


Strand: Water Systems
Learning outcome: Fluids are revisited, specifically water, this time in a system approach. Water systems on a global, municipal and personal level are investigated in this final unit. The differences between fresh and salt water are examined as well as the importance both have on watersheds, weather and life. The case of Walkerton, Ontario is explored and the resulting policy changes that were made in North America. Water consumption and conservation are familiar terms that are reviewed along with what happens when too much or not enough water is present in an area. Finally, students are responsible for advising the public on a water issue.

Social Studies: History & Geography

Strand: Creating Canada, 1850–1890

Learning outcome: Students will build on their understanding of earlier Canadian history, examining how social, political, economic, and legal changes in Canada between 1850 and 1914 affected different individuals, groups, and communities, including First Nations, Métis, and Inuit individuals and communities, in an increasingly diverse and regionally distinct nation. They will explore experiences of and challenges facing people who lived in Canada around the beginning of the twentieth century and will compare them to those people who live in present-day Canada. Students will consider the impact of the Indian Act, the residential school system, the Numbered Treaties, and systemic racism on Indigenous individuals and communities in Canada. They will examine the internal and external forces that led to Confederation and territorial expansion and will analyse the impact of these developments on people in Canada, including First Nations, Métis, and Inuit, as well as new immigrants. Through an examination of inequalities in the new nation, students will learn that many of the rights and freedoms we have in Canada today are the result of actions taken by people in this era to change their lives. Students will develop their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking as well as the historical inquiry process, using both primary and secondary sources to explore the perspectives of groups on issues of concern to people in Canada from the mid-nineteenth century to the eve of World War I.

Strand: Canada, 1890–1914: A Changing Society
Learning outcome: Students will examine their local community, its characteristics and services, and how it meets the needs of the people who live and work there. Students will be introduced to the social studies inquiry process, and will use this process when conducting investigations related to roles, relationships, and responsibilities, and to their local community. In addition, students will learn how to use the basic elements of maps to help them extract information from and construct maps for specific purposes.

Strand:  Patterns and Sustainability

Learning outcome: Students will build on what they have learned in earlier grades about Earth’s physical features and processes in order to explore the relationship between these features/processes and human settlement patterns around the world. They will focus on where people live and why they live there, and on the impact of human settlement and land use on the environment. They will enhance their ability to apply a geographic perspective to their investigation of issues, including issues related to human settlement and sustainability and to global development and quality of life. In addition, students will study factors that affect economic development and quality of life on a global scale and will examine responses to global inequalities. Students will be introduced to new types of maps and graphs, including choropleth maps, scatter graphs, and population pyramids, and, at the same time, will continue to develop their ability to use a variety of sources, tools, and spatial technologies to study various geographic issues.

Strand: Economic Development and Quality of Life
Learning outcome: Students will examine their local community, its characteristics and services, and how it meets the needs of the people who live and work there. Students will be introduced to the social studies inquiry process, and will use this process when conducting investigations related to roles, relationships, and responsibilities, and to their local community. In addition, students will learn how to use the basic elements of maps to help them extract information.

Anchor 5
Anchor 6

Health and Physical Education
 

Strand: Social-Emotional Learning Skills

Learning outcome: Throughout Grade 8, in order to promote overall health and well-being, positive mental health, and the ability to learn, build resilience, and thrive, students will apply a range of social-emotional learning skills as they acquire knowledge and skills in connection with the expectations in the Active Living, Movement Competence, and Healthy Living strands for this grade.

Strand: Active Living
Learning outcome: Students participate actively and regularly in a wide variety of physical activities, and demonstrate an understanding of how physical activity can be incorporated into their daily lives. Students also develop an understanding of the importance of being physically active, and apply physical fitness concepts and practices that contribute to healthy, active living. Students demonstrate responsibility for their own safety and the safety of others as they participate in physical activities.

Strand: Movement Competence

Learning outcome: Students perform movement skills, demonstrating an understanding of the basic requirements of the skills and applying movement concepts as appropriate, as they engage in a variety of physical activities. Students get opportunities to apply movement strategies appropriately, demonstrating an understanding of the components of a variety of physical activities, in order to enhance their ability to participate successfully in those activities.
 

Strand: Healthy Living

Learning outcome: Students develop an understanding of factors that contribute to healthy development and also  demonstrate the ability to apply health knowledge and social-emotional learning skills to make reasoned decisions and take appropriate actions relating to their personal health and wellbeing. Students shows the ability to make connections that relate to health and well-being – how their choices and behaviors affect both themselves and others, and how factors in the world around them affect their own and others’ health and well-being.

Anchor 7

French

Strand: Listening

Learning outcome: Students will listen to understand in order to determine meaning in a variety of oral French texts, using appropriate listening strategies. They will also listen to interact to interpret messages accurately while interacting in French for a variety of purposes and with diverse audiences. Students will demonstrate an understanding of information in oral French texts about aspects of culture in diverse French-speaking communities and other communities around the world, and of French sociolinguistic conventions used in a variety of situations and communities.

Strand: Speaking
Learning outcome: Students will speak to communicate information and ideas orally in French, using a variety of speaking strategies and age- and grade-appropriate language suited to the purpose and audience. They will also speak to participate in spoken interactions in French for a variety of purposes with diverse audiences. Students, in their spoken communications, demonstrate an awareness of aspects of culture in diverse French-speaking communities and other communities around the world, and of the appropriate use of French sociolinguistic conventions in a variety of situations.

Strand: Reading
Learning outcome: Students will determine meaning in a variety of French texts, using a few reading comprehension strategies; While reading, students will identify the purpose(s) and characteristics of a variety of adapted and authentic text forms, including fictional, informational, graphic, and media forms. Students demonstrate an understanding of information in French texts about aspects of culture in diverse French-speaking communities and other communities around the world, and of French sociolinguistic conventions used in a variety of situations and communities.

 


Strand: Writing
Learning outcome: Students write in French in a variety of forms and for a variety of purposes and audiences, using knowledge of vocabulary and stylistic elements to communicate clearly and effectively. Students use the stages of the writing process – including pre-writing, producing drafts, revising, editing, and publishing – to develop and organize content, clarify ideas and expression, correct errors, and present their written work effectively. In their written work, students demonstrate an awareness of aspects of culture in diverse French-speaking communities and other communities around the world, and of the appropriate use of French sociolinguistic conventions in a variety of situations.

Anchor 8

International Language 

Strand: Listening

Learning outcome: Students will listen to understand in order to determine meaning in a variety of oral International language texts, using appropriate listening strategiesThey will also listen to interact to interpret messages accurately while interacting in International language for a variety of purposes and with diverse audiences. Students will demonstrate an understanding of information in oral International language texts about aspects of culture in diverse International language-speaking communities and other communities around the world, and of International language sociolinguistic conventions used in a variety of situations and communities.

Strand: Speaking
Learning outcome: Students will speak to communicate information and ideas orally in International language, using a variety of speaking strategies and age- and grade-appropriate language suited to the purpose and audience. They will also speak to participate in spoken interactions in International language for a variety of purposes with diverse audiences. Students, in their spoken communications, demonstrate an awareness of aspects of culture in diverse International language-speaking communities and other communities around the world, and of the appropriate use of International language sociolinguistic conventions in a variety of situations.

Strand: Reading
Learning outcome: Students will determine meaning in a variety of International language texts, using a few reading comprehension strategies; While reading, students will identify the purpose(s) and characteristics of a variety of adapted and authentic text forms, including fictional, informational, graphic, and media forms. Students demonstrate an understanding of information in International language texts about aspects of culture in diverse International language-speaking communities and other communities around the world, and of French sociolinguistic conventions used in a variety of situations and communities.

 


Strand: Writing
Learning outcome: Students write in International language in a variety of forms and for a variety of purposes and audiences, using knowledge of vocabulary and stylistic elements to communicate clearly and effectively. Students use the stages of the writing process – including pre-writing, producing drafts, revising, editing, and publishing – to develop and organize content, clarify ideas and expression, correct errors, and present their written work effectively. In their written work, students demonstrate an awareness of aspects of culture in diverse International language-speaking communities and other communities around the world, and of the appropriate use of International language sociolinguistic conventions in a variety of situations.

Teachers at My Learning Oasis follow the Ontario Curriculum outline as a base of their inquiry and project based learning for students success. For more information about Ontario Curriculum click HERE

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